Jobst to cut 200 North Carolina manufacturing jobs, moves to Mexico

Jobst is one the of largest and best known compression hosiery brands in the United States.  We were caught by surprise to learn that, in a cost-cutting measure, all US production is being moved to Reynosa, Mexico.  The BSN Jobst facility in Rutherford College, NC is now in the process of being closed.  We’ve been assured by Jobst that the quality of their stockings will remain the same. They will be knit on the same machines, with the same fibers, just in a location wijobst-logo-blogth cheaper labor.

 

 

The Jobst move will have a profound impact in that North Carolina region’s economy.

The Morganton, NC News Herald quotes Rutherford College Town Manager Kenneth B. Geathers Jr. as saying, “A bigger issue is the effect it will have on the town’s human capital.  The field of manufacturing has gradually been dissolving before our eyes. If you built a life here in Burke County and you were an employee of BSN, you’ve got to start all over.”

Speaking on behalf of BSN Medical (the parent company) Ann Maitland, group director of global operations said “I regret these developments for our plant here in Rutherford College, but out of a business perspective this decision was indispensable to secure the long-term success of our company. We want to thank all colleagues for their contribution to BSN and wish them the best for their future.”

BrightLife Direct salutes our other suppliers who have chosen to keep manufacturing in the USA, providing the kinds of jobs that are necessary to maintain the strong communities in which they are located.  Sigvaris is made in Georgia.  Mediven, Therafirm and Allegro (our private label brand) are made in North Carolina.  Juzo is made in Ohio.  LympheDivas are knit in North Carolina and printed & pressed in Massachusetts. Thanks guys!

What You Can Eat To Prevent Varicose Veins

Varicose veins can be caused by sitting or standing for long periods of time, or from running or lifting weights. This condition can be hereditary, or triggered by your lifestyle. There are a couple of things you can do to prevent varicose veins and spider veins, including wearing compression socks, taking walks, and even incorporating certain foods into your diet.

Avocados contain a high concentration of glutathione, which helps to protect your heart, veins and arteries from oxidant damage. Glutathione is a tripeptide molecule that also ensures that Vitamin C and Vitamin E are functioning properly. If you have varicose veins, it is important to incorporate lots of foods with these vitamins into your diet. Vitamin C helps to increase circulation and keep your veins strong. Vitamin E helps to enhance the effects of Vitamin C.

Blueberries are great for your heart and also help to improve your memory, fight aging, help you digest, improve skin health and enhance weight loss. Blueberries also help to prevent varicose veins because they repair damaged proteins in the blood vessel walls and promote the overall health of the vascular system.  They also are a great source of fiber and Vitamin E. It is important to drink a lot of water throughout the day to avoid constipation, which puts pressure on your veins. Try to avoid any coffee, tea or alcohol, as to not dehydrate your body. Instead, try something rich in fiber, such as apples, berries, flaxseed, oats, carrots, peas, beans or barley.

Watercress, or the “cure of cures” according to Hippocrates, the father of medicine, benefits anyone with varicose veins. It is available year round and goes great in a salad. Ginger is also frequently used to treat varicose veins because it can dissolve fibrin in the blood vessels, which can be difficult for someone with varicose veins to break down. Fibrin causes your veins to get hard and lumpy, so it is important to dissolve it. Like ginger, rosemary also helps to improve circulation. Rosemary helps to strengthen the capillaries and protect tissues from damage. You can add rosemary to fish, fruits and meats, but it is also commonly found in skin care products that are used to treat varicose veins.

Those green vegetables your mom always force fed you when you were younger really pay off in the long run. Asparagus strengthens your veins and capillaries to keep them from rupturing and helps to prevent varicose veins. You can also eat beets to significantly reduce your homocysteine levels. This amino acid can damage your blood vessels, so make sure you eat your beets! The tops of the beets can be cooked and eaten just like spinach. Lastly, buckwheat is also great for vascular health because it is high in protein and helps with tissue repair. Buckwheat is one of the best natural sources for rutin, which may be a reason for varicose veins and spider veins developing if you do not consume enough of it.

By reducing the amount of calories you consume, you can help to reduce your risk of varicose veins, or improve the appearance of varicose veins. According to www.healwithfood.org, “a high energy intake is associated with an increased risk of varicose veins because it can contribute to the development of obesity and excess body weight.” If you are overweight and have varicose veins, you should eat five to six small meals throughout the day to boost and maintain your metabolism, while crushing the temptation to eat sweets.

Varicose veins can be prevented or treated simply by changing your diet. This condition affects up to 60% of people. Check out some of the recipes below to keep your body happy and healthy. You don’t have to give up all of the foods you love either. There are tons of different recipes to choose from, including zucchini noodles, tomato soup, chocolate cake and more. You can’t help but find a delicious meal that promotes strong, healthy veins.

Resources

Breakfast Recipes

Salad Recipes

Soup Recipes

Dinner Recipes

Dessert Recipes

Drink Recipes

Varicose Veins & Diet

Are You At Risk For Varicose Veins?

Stop Snoring and Start Wearing Compression Socks

Did you know that there are a few simple things you can do to stop snoring loudly at night? It’s as easy as wearing compression socks during the day, or changing the position you typically sleep in. If you’re sick and tired of snoring and keeping your loved ones awake, here are some tips to help you sleep better, without modifying your routine much.

Although snoring is a somewhat normal occurrence, your body is trying to tell you something. Most people don’t recognize the symptoms of a sleeping disorder early on to be able to treat it properly. If you often snore loudly when you sleep, it can be a sign of sleep apnea, a condition that occurs when you stop and start breathing while you rest. This may happen hundreds of times a night and can last for 10-20 seconds each time. This prevents you from getting a good night’s sleep, which is why you feel slow or tired the next day, no matter how long you slept the night before.

Some of the most common symptoms of sleep apnea include snoring, irregular breathing while sleeping, morning headaches, memory or learning problems, waking up with a dry mouth or sore throat, being unable to concentrate, and feeling tired or have trouble staying awake during the day. Sleep apnea may also be the reason why you feel depressed, irritable or experience mood swings. It is important to understand the difference between snoring and a sleeping disorder to make sure there isn’t a serious problem going on. Sleep apnea can cause diabetes, heart disease, weight gain and even increase your risk of a stroke if left untreated.

Whether you have a sleeping disorder or if you are just a loud snorer, there are tons of things you can do to get a better night’s sleep. Start by wearing compression socks during the day. Those with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) wear compression socks to reduce the how much fluid builds up in their legs during the day. At night, this fluid moves into the neck area, which can lead to sleep apnea and snoring. If you have to get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom a lot, wearing compression socks will also help to reduce this. Compression stockings are also great to energize tired, achy legs, reduce swelling, improve blood flow and to wear while traveling or exercising. Choose from tons of everyday and dress styles in knee highs, thigh highs and pantyhose options. After a long day of being on your feet, you will love how great your legs feel.

“The Toronto study found that by the end of two weeks, patients with CVI who used compression stockings cut the number of apnea episodes in half while patients who didn’t use the socks showed no change.”

Some quick and easy things you can do to stop snoring is to use a humidifier when you sleep, take a shower or change your sleeping position. Taking a shower helps to open your nasal passages, which eliminates a stuffy nose and helps you breath better. Dry air can lead to snoring, so try using a humidifier to cut down on snoring. One of the best solutions to stop snoring is to change how you sleep.  Start sleeping on your side instead of your back. When you lay on your back it makes it harder to breathe as the airway narrows, which may be the source of your snoring. Use nasal spray before you go to bed to keep your nasal passages open so you can breathe better at night.

A couple of other things you can do for a more long-term solution are to stop smoking and maintaining a healthy weight. Another key factor is to keep a clean house because dust often stirs up allergies and can also lead to snoring. Talk to your doctor to find the best sleeping solution for you. Over 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, and most aren’t even aware of it. For more information, check out the resources below.

Resources

What Is Sleep Apnea?

American Sleep Apnea Association

BrightLife Direct – Compression Socks

Click Here If You Are New To Compression

Men’s Health: The No-Snore Sleep Solution

Blog: Sleep Through The Night With Compression Socks

National Lymphedema Network #LymphChat on CDT

Yesterday, the National Lymphedema Network (NLN) hosted its first ever #LymphChat on Twitter to discuss treatment and surgical options for people with lymphedema. Special guests Nicole Stout and Dr. Jay Granzow led the discussion covering Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT), compression garments and other treatment options. Nicole Stout is a lymphedema therapist, researcher and NLN board member. Dr. Jay Granzow is a microsurgeon who specializes in the surgical treatment of lymphedema, including Lymphatic Venous Anastomosis (LVA), Vascularized Lymph Node Transfer (VLNT), Suction-Assisted Protein Lipectomy (SAPL) and more. This chat provided great insight as people shared their lymphedema experiences, questions and management tips.

The first topic covered the components of Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT), which is the most common non-invasive lymphedema treatment. CDT is the first thing that the National Lymphedema Network recommends. Overall, a lot of people found CDT to be effective but difficult. Nicole Stout noted that using compression garments and taking good care of yourself can reduce the number of sessions needed. “CDT has many components and requires intervention from a skilled therapist. After treatment, patients keep up with CDT on their own,” she added. Complete Decongestive Therapy has four components: Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD), compression bandaging, skin care and exercise.

Manual Lymph Drainage is a big part of lymphedema care. It is very time consuming, but can make patients feel a lot better. Depending on the patient, some do their MLD routinely, others use pumps at home, and some don’t practice MLD at all. Using compression garments and pump therapy are very beneficial, as well as practicing deep breathing to help stimulate the lymphatic system. Check out this video on manual lymphatic drainage for more information. Remember to stay hydrated before and after MLD to avoid feeling sick or tired.

There are a lot of compression options you can use to manage lymphedema, including elastic/day garments, bandages and bandage alternatives. One #LymphChat participant shared that a custom Juzo armsleeve and glove work well during the day, and wears the JoViPak armsleeve at night. Compression armsleeves help to prevent and treat lymphedema in the arm, but brands like Juzo, JoViPak, and Solaris offer compression garments to treat lymphedema in other body parts – including the legs and trunk area. BrightLife Direct offers tons of brands, colors and compression levels to choose from so you can find the perfect garment for you.

Skin care is also extremely important for Complete Decongestive Therapy and preventing infections. You can also wear silver liners, or compression stockings that are made with silver to fight off bacteria and prevent infections. During the day, you can use Medi Day Gel to moisturize your skin. Apply it before you put on your compression garment to make it easier to don. Don’t worry, this gel will not damage your garments like other lotions may. Some moisturizers break down the material due to the lycra in the garment and reduce its effectiveness and breathability, so make sure you use a garment-friendly gel! Medi Day Gel quickly absorbs into your skin to avoid sticky or greasy residue. At night, you can sooth your legs with Medi Night Creme. It also helps to treat venous insufficiency.

The last component of CDT is exercising, which helps to stimulate the lymphatic system.  Lymphedema patient, Amy Santiago says that opening up the Lymph channels (neck/collar, armpits, stomach and breathing) help her before starting cardio or training. One way to open up these channels before exercising is with Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD). Swimming, yoga and snowshoeing are all great exercises for lymphedema patients.

Towards the end of the #LymphChat, participants discussed surgical treatments for Lymphedema. According to Dr. Jay Granzow, Suction-Assisted Protein Lipectomy (SAPL), Lymphatic Venous Anastomosis (LVA) and Vascularized Lymph Node Transfer (VLNT) are the most effective lymphedema surgeries. SAPL greatly reduces excess volume in chronic lymphedema patients, and is generally performed in later cases when solids accumulate in the leg or arm. Frequently after SAPL, the use of a compression garment allows you to significantly cut down on CDT, or eliminates the need for it altogether. Other patients, usually in the earlier stages of lymphedema, undergo LVA and VLNT due to excess fluid buildup. You can also combine VLNT and LVA after healing from SAPL to treat solid and fluid components. Compression therapy after these procedures are vital.

Dr. Jay Granzow believes that depending on the patient, each type of surgery can be a success, based on the stage they’re in. As Nicole pointed out, “not just any surgeon can perform these surgeries. Special expertise is needed.” There is a limited number of surgeons that are trained in lymphedema surgery. Although most of Dr. Jay Granzow’s patients have had their surgeries covered by insurance, it depends on your insurance plan. To determine if you qualify for surgery, see a surgeon that specializes in these treatments for an evaluation, as well as a lymphedema therapist to figure out what the best treatment options are for you. Click here for more information on SAPL, VLNT and LVA procedures.

On the first Tuesday of every month, the National Lymphedema Network will continue to host a Twitter Chat, so make sure you follow them on Twitter at @lymphnet and include #lymphchat in your tweets to participate! If you think of any other questions that you would like to ask, email nln@lymphnet.org. The next Twitter Chat will be on Tuesday, May 5th, 2015 about lymphedema and exercise. Don’t miss it!

Additional Resources

Chat with us on Twitter! #LymphChat

BrightLife Direct  |  Nicole Stout  |  Dr. Jay Granzow  |  National Lymphedema Network